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Agriculture

            Over 50 years since its independence, India has made immense progress towards food security. Indian population has tripled, but food-grain production more than quadrupled: there has thus been substantial increase in available food-grain per capita. Prior to the mid-1960s India relied on imports and food aid to meet domestic requirements. However, two years of severe drought in 1965 and 1966 convinced India to reform its agricultural policy, and that India could not rely on foreign aid and foreign imports for food security. India adopted significant policy reforms focused on the goal of foodgrain self-sufficiency. This ushered in India's Green Revolution. It began with the decision to adopt superior yielding, disease resistant wheat varieties in combination with better farming knowledge to improve productivity. The Indian state of Punjab led India's green revolution and earned itself the distinction of being the country's bread basket.[41] The initial increase in production was centred on the irrigated areas of the Indian states of Punjab, Haryana and western Uttar Pradesh. With both the farmers and the government officials focusing on farm productivity and knowledge transfer, India's total foodgrain production soared. A hectare of Indian wheat farms that produced an average of 0.8 tons in 1948, produced 4.7 tons of wheat in 1975 from the same land. Such rapid growths in farm productivity enabled India to become self-sufficient by the 1970s. It also empowered the smallholder farmers to seek further means to increase food staples produced per hectare. By 2000, Indian farms were adopting wheat varieties capable of yielding 6 tons of wheat per hectare. Agricultural Engineering as a profession is of great importance to India.


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Courses

B.Sc. Agriculture (Elg.- PUC pass) - 3 years


Agriculture Uses

The social, cultural and economic structure of the rural communities within the watershed has its roots in the land. Livestock grazing came with the first white settlers. Intertwined with the economic aspect of livestock operations are the lifestyles and cultures that have co-evolved with western ranching. Using water from streams and rivers to irrigate crops has made intensive agriculture possible on some of the private lands in the valleys and foothills. Much of the valley land produces forage crops such as alfalfa and pasture hay to maintain livestock all over the region as well as the resident beef cattle. Alfalfa from the intermountain region is prized by central valley and coastal dairy producers, and a lot of grass hay grown here serves the local markets of India.